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Serving the Tri County Area since 1999
(330) 534-8500
Serving the Tri County Area since 1999
(330) 534-8500

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Temporomandibular joint disorder, or dysfunction, (TMD) is a common condition that limits the natural functions of the jaw, such as opening the mouth and chewing. It currently affects more than 10 million people in the United States. It is sometimes incorrectly referred to as simply “TMJ,” which represents the name of the joint itself. TMD affects more women than men and is most often diagnosed in individuals aged 20 to 40 years. Its causes range from poor posture, chronic jaw clenching, and poor teeth alignment, to fracture or conditions such as lockjaw, where the muscles around the jaw spasm and reduce the opening of the mouth. Physical therapists help people with TMD ease pain, regain normal jaw movement, and lessen daily stress on the jaw.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Concussion (1)

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Concussion Concussion is a traumatic brain injury that can cause lasting effects on brain tissue and change the chemical balance of the brain. Concussion may cause physical, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms and problems, both short-term and long-term. Every concussion is considered a serious injury by health care providers. If you have experienced a head injury, seek medical help immediately. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that 1.6 million to 3.8 million people experience concussions during sports and recreational activities annually in the United States. These numbers may be underestimated, as many cases are likely never reported. A physical therapist can assess symptoms to determine if a concussion is present, and treat the injury by guiding the patient through a safe and individualized recovery program.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)

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Every year, millions of people in the United States develop vertigo, a sensation that you or your surroundings are spinning.The sensation can be very disturbing and may increase the risk of falling. If you've been diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), you're not alone—at least 9 out of every 100 older adults are affected, making it one of the most common types of episodic vertigo. The good news is that BPPV is treatable. Your physical therapist will use unique tests to confirm vertigo, and use special exercises and maneuvers to help.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Tear

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An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is an injury to the knee commonly affecting athletes, such as soccer players, basketball players, skiers, and gymnasts. Nonathletes can also experience an ACL tear due to injury or accident. Approximately 200,000 ACL injuries are diagnosed in the United States each year. It is estimated that there are 95,000 ruptures of the ACL and 100,000 ACL reconstructions performed per year in the United States. Approximately 70% of ACL tears in sports are the result of noncontact injuries, and 30% are the result of direct contact (player-to-player, player-to-object). Women are more likely than men to experience an ACL tear. Physical therapists are trained to help individuals with ACL tears reduce pain and swelling, regain strength and movement, and return to desired activities.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Osteoarthritis of the Knee

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Osteoarthritis of the knee (knee OA) is the inflammation and degeneration of the bones that form the knee joint (osteo=bone, arthro=joint, itis=inflammation). The diagnosis of knee OA is based on 2 primary findings: radiographic evidence of changes in bone health (through medical images such as x-ray and MRI) and an individual’s symptoms (how you feel). Approximately 14% of adults aged 25+ and 34% of adults aged 65+ are diagnosed with radiographic osteoarthritis. Specifically, about 16% of adults aged 45+ have knee OA.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Low Back Pain

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If you have low back pain, you are not alone. At any given time, about 25% of people in the United States report having low back pain within the past 3 months. In most cases, low back pain is mild and disappears on its own. For some people, back pain can return or hang on, leading to a decrease in quality of life or even to disability.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Spinal Stenosis

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It's estimated that as many as 75% of us will have some form of back or neck pain at some point in our lifetime. The good news is that most of us will recover without the need for surgery—and conservative care such as physical therapy usually gets better results than surgery. Spinal stenosis is one cause of back and neck pain. It affects your vertebrae (the bones of your back), narrowing the openings within those bones where the spinal cord and nerves pass through.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Osteoporosis

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Osteoporosis is a common disease that causes a thinning and weakening of the bones. It can affect people of any age. Women have the greatest risk of developing the disease, although it also occurs in men. Osteoporosis affects 55% of Americans aged 50 or older; one-half of women and a quarter of men will fracture a bone.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Osteoarthritis

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"Arthritis" is a term used to describe inflammation of the joints. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and usually is caused by the deterioration of a joint. Typically, the weight-bearing joints are affected, with the knee and the hip being the most common.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Herniated Disk

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A herniated disc occurs when the cushion-like cartilage (the disc) between the bones of the spine is torn, and the gelatin-like core of the disc leaks. Often mistakenly called a slipped disc, a herniated disc can be caused by sudden trauma or by long-term pressure on the spine. This condition most often affects people aged 30 to 50 years; men are twice as likely to be diagnosed as women. Repeated lifting, participating in weight-bearing sports, obesity, smoking, and poor posture are all risk factors for a herniated disc. The majority of herniated discs do not require surgery, and respond best to physical therapy. Physical therapists design individualized treatment programs to help people with herniated discs regain normal movement, reduce pain, and get back to their regular activities.

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Physical Therapist's Guide to Degenerative Disk Disease

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It's estimated that as many as 75% of us will have some form of back or neck pain at some point in our lifetime. The good news is that most of us will recover without the need for surgery—and conservative care such as physical therapy usually gets better results than surgery. Degenerative disk disease (DDD) is one cause of back and neck pain. Usually the result of the natural aging process, degenerative disk disease (DDD) is a type of osteoarthritis of the spine.

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Practice Areas

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Physical therapist education includes an extensive background in the sciences, focusing on physics, anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, and kinesiology. With this background, physical therapists are able to restore and maximize mobility.

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Benefits of a Physical Therapist

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Physical therapists examine, evaluate, and treat patients who have conditions such as back pain, neck pain, burns, wounds, osteoporosis, developmental disabilities, carpal tunnel syndrome, and countless other conditions affecting an individual's ability to move freely and without pain

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Research and Interventions

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Physical therapists apply the latest research related to restoring function, reducing pain, and preventing injury. As a health care professional, you may be interested in some of the latest research on the impact a physical therapist can have on specific conditions and injuries.

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How Physical Therapists Practice

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Physical therapists and other health care professionals have a shared goal of creating healthier, satisfied patients. They collaborate with other health care professionals to develop treatment plans for patients using the latest research and proven approaches to ensure positive outcomes.

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